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Oil spraying out of exhaust manifold

  #21  
Old 08-13-2018, 08:31 PM
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Ok so quick update...I am an idiot for not realizing what I now believe to be the problem. I have everything but the valve covers and heads removed. After eating dinner, I went to move the intake plenum and a very runny substance ran out. Too runny to be oil and it smelled strongly enough of gasoline to be sure that's what it is. Something all of us overlooked was the fact that my O2 sensors are just hanging out in the outside air, causing the computer to dump most likely extreme amounts of fuel. I believe the gas was dissolving carbon deposits and evaporating enough that the smell of the deposits overpowered the gasoline, but there was still enough gas to make the substance oil-like. I'm sure some of the carbon deposits are oil deposits as well. Another stupid thing I overlooked was the fact that my driveway is tar/blacktop. I was sampling the substance with my had off the driveway, which gasoline readily dissolves. And what is tar made of? Oil. Another thing that confirms this is that I pulled the number 3 spark plug and it was bone dry and clean as a whistle. The intake and exhaust ports are also very clean and dry. The intake plenum is full of carbon so all the surfaces around it were still wet and covered in "oil". I'm going to try to get it back together tonight, but it took me 3 hours to get to where I just did plus I'll have to install the cat section of exhaust and clean and test the O2 sensors using a multimeter and a torch. They will function well enough that I will be able to confirm my suspicions. They are currently covered in "oil". I may be wrong, but I don't think it's wise to remove the heads before confirming or denying this. The truck did run very well before this project so there really can't be a crack in the heads. I thoroughly cleaned every area of them and I'm sure I would have seen a crack large enough to dump this much oil. Also the reason this "oil" was only mostly in cylinders 3 and 6 is that the EGR tube was sucking up the excess from that bank and depositing it into the intake, where it (mostly) flew over the first 4 cylinders and into the back two. I didn't see gas in the pcv or egr tube before because the gas must have evaporated before I could remove them. Oil would most definitely still be visible in there. Let me know what you guys think, but I'm gonna go spend at least an hour getting some stuff back together. The one thing that doesn't make sense is that there was no black smoke as if running rich, but could it be that waaay too rich would hinder combustion enough to not create the smoke? I believe some of this substance to be water as well (from combustion)...more fuel=more water. There were no misfires though, but I'm not sure if maybe I need a crank sensor relearn. The truck seemed to actually be running pretty well for what is going on. Last thing I did to confirm was recheck my oil again. The oil level reading changes dramatically depending on which direction the dipstick is inserted. When inserted with the level markings facing down, I got the same reading as I did after filling the oil. Sorry if this post seems fragmented, but I've been in and out between the truck and computer adding to this post. This should be it though lol
 

Last edited by Nicholas McKay; 08-13-2018 at 08:37 PM.
  #22  
Old 08-14-2018, 02:35 AM
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Do you know what a head slap is?
Don't feel badly, the important thing is you found the source of the problem and hopefully the reason for the glug glug sound.
Unfortunately, we could not see that part of the problem from where we are. Your logic makes sense and thanks for the update !
 
  #23  
Old 08-14-2018, 08:35 AM
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Iím especially glad that I did not get as far as loosening even one head bolt.

It could very well be that the glug sound could have always been there when cranking. This is probably just the first time Iíve cranked this engine without it firing right away. I should have things put back together late tonight so Iíll let everyone know the results. Turns out one of the O2 sensors were smashed between something heavy and something heavy, and the heater (and I assume voltage circuit as well) no longer function, but I have an extra one laying around from my Suburban which Iíll just splice and solder to the Sport Tracís connector. As I understand it, this is no different from universal sensor kits except for the fact these are Densoís...so probably better quality. At least a good enough replacement for the time being. I do know for sure that the voltage ranges are the same (.1v-.9v).
 

Last edited by Nicholas McKay; 08-14-2018 at 08:39 AM.
  #24  
Old 08-14-2018, 04:39 PM
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What I think I’ll do is steal the downstream sensor to replace the broken upstream sensor. I’ll use the Denso sensor to plug that hole and test my theory. They are very different. The Densos have the filters on the outside for reference air and I believe the one from the truck breathes through the top where the wires go in. Also, the sensor tip is much different. They’re both 4 wire and same voltage range, though so I figured it’s worth a try. I have a code reader so I’ll be able to detect any issues that arise. Are you saying that the Densos I put in my Suburban instead of the OEM ones could be causing it to read lean?
 
  #25  
Old 08-14-2018, 07:29 PM
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Different manufacturers try to make a line of parts where they try to have a few cover most requirements. Not to knock aftermarket replacement parts which sometimes we have no other option, but I have found OEM parts especially the original parts most of the time solved the problem when some aftermarket parts did not.

One vehicle manufacturer will specify certain parts and design their systems to work only with those parts and you may find as did I , that that is common practice.
Some aftermarket suppliers will make an improved version of an original part and that is appreciated. Unfortunately , the other side of the equation is there too.
I appreciate your updates and wish you all the best for your hard work and diligence.Thanks for keeping us informed and will try to assist as you grow in this profession,,,,,,,and you never know you may just be assisting me with a problem, thanks.
 
  #26  
Old 08-16-2018, 02:42 PM
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Got a little busy with some other stuff, but I'm about to go out and put the battery in and bolt on the exhaust and see what kind of readings I'm getting from my BlueDriver. The Denso O2 sensor will go after the cat and I'll move the one that's currently in that spot forward to fill in for the broken one. Could be a few hours because I had to hack the siezed and broken bolts out of the exhaust pieces so I need to find a way to be sure they're secure.
 
  #27  
Old 08-17-2018, 09:07 AM
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Decided to try to fire it up before installing the exhaust just to be sure it'll fire and it did for a couple seconds, then it backfired (very muffled sounding backfire, almost like a potato gun or something like that). Tried to crank it again and it wouldn't start. At this moment I look up and I'm like "that doesn't look like where the smoke was coming from before". I thought for sure I blew a head gasket, so I sat there, defeated for about 10 seconds and decided to go check on the ever increasing amounts of smoke. Well, I was met with a small engine fire. It was very easy to extinguish with a garden hose, however so there is no lasting damage. I think it was just gas burning on the surfaces that were sprayed. This I believe defeats my O2 sensor theory on why it is overfueling, since the ECM was reset before this and the engine would have been in open loop since it was cold. The fire does very much confirm that it is fuel and not oil. After a couple more cranks, I reached into the manifold, and sure enough, the substance was almost straight gasoline instead of the oily substance from before so I'm guessing whatever deposits were in there before were mostly dissolved. The only thing I've done since then is check the fuel pressure and it's an even 60 psi. I assume this is probably correct, but I should probably check on that spec before drawing conclusions. My next course of action would be checking for a stuck open injector. I was not able to test the pressure at the rail because I don't seem to have the proper adapter, but being a returnless system, I was able to test directly after the fuel filter with a T-fitting. My biggest fear, and probably most likely answer is that the timing slipped on bank 1 for sure and maybe bank 2 as well, but most likely to a lesser extent, if at all. The fire was on bank 1 by the way. I do have the required timing kit, so it was set correctly at one point and the problem DOES seem to be getting progressively worse. It would make sense, since bank one's camshaft sprocket bolt is much harder to properly torque with the engine in the vehicle. Improper timing would explain the raw fuel in both the exhaust and intake, and most likely explains the backfire/fire. So, unless anyone has any other suggestions, I'll be tearing down everything to the camshafts for the fourth time lol. I'll stop and check the injectors before going any further though.
 
  #28  
Old 08-17-2018, 01:06 PM
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Just noticed that the camshaft bolts are TTY. I guess this is what happens when TTY bolts are reused though. They were torqued correctly and let the sprocket slip within a minute of running. That is if the timing is the problem...
 
  #29  
Old 08-18-2018, 08:40 AM
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Hi Nick,
Yea we're on a first name basis by this time lol.
If you found the timing did slip you might consider looking into the chain tensioners that are spring loaded and should have been replaced with the chains etc.
Something else to consider, since it sounds like a lot of raw fuel has gone down into the pan , that oil is diluted and can allow other problems to begin. Might be a good move to get it out of there and add fresh oil.
If you suspect too much gas is getting into the cyls , pull the plugs and it should tell you which if one cyl or all are getting too much fuel. Based on what you find there should help determine your next move.
If you need to crank the engine over to do anything , it might be a good idea to pull the fuse that provides power to the injectors so they don;t keep adding fuel to the cyls., just don't forget to reinstall it when done. You can also disable the fuel pump by pulling that fuse or you can rap the inertia switch and open the circuit that way.
These are a few of the tidbits that might help. Thanks for the updates.
 
  #30  
Old 08-23-2018, 04:31 PM
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Originally Posted by hanky View Post
Hi Nick,
Yea we're on a first name basis by this time lol.
If you found the timing did slip you might consider looking into the chain tensioners that are spring loaded and should have been replaced with the chains etc.
Something else to consider, since it sounds like a lot of raw fuel has gone down into the pan , that oil is diluted and can allow other problems to begin. Might be a good move to get it out of there and add fresh oil.
If you suspect too much gas is getting into the cyls , pull the plugs and it should tell you which if one cyl or all are getting too much fuel. Based on what you find there should help determine your next move.
If you need to crank the engine over to do anything , it might be a good idea to pull the fuse that provides power to the injectors so they don;t keep adding fuel to the cyls., just don't forget to reinstall it when done. You can also disable the fuel pump by pulling that fuse or you can rap the inertia switch and open the circuit that way.
These are a few of the tidbits that might help. Thanks for the updates.

Sorry for disappearing like that on everyone. Had a touch of the flu. Anyway, today I decided to take the passenger front tire off to get a better look at the OIL leak. Yes, oil, not gas, oil. I thought the oil was coming out of the exhaust because it was leaking above where the exhaust blows out, so I'm sure you can see my rookie mistake. It's very funny that hanky mentioned the timing chain tensioner, because as soon as I had the tire off I had a perfect view of the leak and it turned out easier than I thought and it was free to to fix. I feel stupid even admitting to it, but I left the crush washer off the rear tensioner, leading to a massive oil leak. Washer has been replaced, tensioner primed and torqued to spec... and not a single drop leaking anymore. I will have the a chance to look at fuel trims later as I'm sure there will be issues from the oil soaked O2 sensors, but for now, I have to get the exhaust bolted together tightly so that it seals and doesn't **** off the neighbors more than I have already. However, the engine seems to be purring like a kitten but obviously much louder. It did quiet down as soon as I took care of the leak at least to the point where it just sounds like it has straight pipes or maybe a glass pack. The exhaust pieces are very messed up because I had to cut seized bolts right out of the cast iron, leaving a U shape for the bolts rather than holes, but I think with some effort and some exhaust putty, I'll get it figured out. So I think we can finally put an end to this thread. Thanks for everyone's help. I really appreciate it. And remember...USE YOUR WASHERS!!!!
 

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